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Seven accused “spies” are fitted with explosive cables dubbed “decapitation necklaces

Seven accused “spies” are fitted with explosive cables dubbed “decapitation necklaces

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It was reported that after one month of supplementing with tongkat ali, the number of men in the group with normal testosterone levels jumped to over 90%.

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Love really is like a drug

Intense spells of passion are as effective at blocking pain as cocaine and other illicit drugs, a team of neuroscientists say. Tests on 15 American students who admitted to being in the passionate early stages of a relationship showed that feelings for their partner reduced intense pain by 12% and moderate pain by 45%.

In the study, researchers at Stanford University showed eight women and seven men photographs of their partners while delivering mild doses of pain to their palms with a hot probe. At the same time, the students had their brains scanned by a functional magnetic resonance imaging machine. At the end of each test, the students were asked to rate how much pain they felt.

Feelings of love, triggered by a photo of their partner, acted as a powerful painkiller. Brain scans revealed that these feelings caused more activity in parts of the brain that are also triggered by morphine and cocaine. Looking at an image of an attractive friend rather than their partner had only a mild analgesic effect.

The study went on to investigate whether distracting the students also reduced pain by giving them simple mental tasks, such as naming sports that do not involve a ball.

The brain scans showed that while both love and distraction reduce pain, they appear to act on different pathways in the brain.

Jarred Younger, who led the study published in Plos One, said: "With the distraction test, the brain pathways leading to pain relief were mostly cognitive. The reduction of pain was associated with higher, cortical parts of the brain.

"Love-induced analgesia is much more associated with the reward centres. It appears to involve more primitive aspects of the brain, activating deep structures that may block pain at a spinal level: similar to how opioid analgesics work."

He added, "One of the key sites for love-induced analgesia is the nucleus accumbens, a key reward addiction centre for opioids, cocaine and other drugs of abuse. The region tells the brain that you really need to keep doing this."

Younger's team recruited students in the first nine months of a relationship, when feelings of passion are at their most intense.

"We intentionally focused on this early phase of passionate love. We specifically were not looking for longer-lasting, more mature phases of the relationship. We wanted subjects who were feeling euphoric, energetic, obsessively thinking about their beloved, craving their presence," Sean Mackey, a co-author on the paper, said.

"When passionate love is described like this, it in some ways sounds like an addiction. We thought, maybe this does involve similar brain systems as those involved in addictions."

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Tongkat ali standardization is a scam, copied many times over on the Internet. Good for you if it's just a lie (which most probably it is) . Bad for you if indeed they enrich their alleged tongkat ali with eurycomanone. Because it would be reagent grade eurycomanone, not pharmaceutical grade. Better be careful with your health.

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Falling in Love is Like Smoking Crack Cocaine

My over-arching theory of the life course of successful relationships, described more fully in my book, includes the notion that all relationships begin with what I call the “cocaine rush” phase. The cocaine-rush phase is an initial period of intense, highly pleasurable bonding based on the mutual fantasy that you and the other person are ideally matched and perfectly suited for each other. (In reference to my recent series of blog posts on the concept of soul mates, it is during the cocaine rush phase that a feeling of having found one’s soul mate has tremendous emotional pull on new lovers.)

I would not be the first person to draw a comparison between the state of falling in love and the state of feeling high on drugs. The concept of new love as addiction appears with frequency in many aspects of popular culture. If a bit pessimistic, selected excerpts of the song "A New Way to Fly" performed by Garth Brooks certainly demonstrate a healthy level of insight of how this can play out in love relationships:

Like birds on a high line/They line up at night time at the bar/They all once were lovebirds/Now bluebirds are all that they are/They landed in hell/The minute they fell from love's sky/And now they hope in the wine/That they'll find a new way to fly…/They've all crashed and burned/But they can leave it behind/If they could just find/A new way to fly/…By the end of the night/They'll be high as a kite once again…*

A less insightful, and certainly less dark and foreboding, version of this notion surfaces in the song "Hooked on a Feeling" written by Mark James and performed by B.J. Thomas:

I'm hooked on a feelin'/High on believin'/That you're in love with me/Lips as sweet as candy/The taste stays on my mind/Girl, you keep me thirsty/For another cup of wine/..I got it bad for you, girl/But I don't need a cure/I'll just stay addicted/and hope I can endure!**

Despite the existence of many cultural (and lyrical) analogies between love and addictive drugs, the degree to which this effect drives poor decision-making in relationships suggests that this concept may yet be underestimated and underappreciated. Though I’m not the first writer to compare falling into love to becoming addicted to a mind-altering drug, it seems to me that the most fitting comparison drug is crack cocaine.

That is, there are striking similarities between the brain state of a person falling in love and that of a person who has just smoked crack cocaine. We're not talking about the slightly buzzed feeling you might get from drinking a glass or two of wine, but rather about the high-octane euphoria associated with smoking crack cocaine. Falling in love is the best high you can get without breaking any laws.

Dr. Helen Fisher, an anthropologist and relationship researcher, conducted a series of illuminating studies on the brain chemistry of love. Specifically, she found that the same brain chemicals (that is, massive amounts of dopamine and norepinephrine ) are in play, and many of the same brain pathways and structures are active when we are falling in love and enjoying a cocaine-high.***

Consider the specific euphoric effects of smoking crack cocaine. In the short run, according to the website cocaine.org, smoking crack cocaine leads to enhanced mood, heightened sexual interest, a feeling of increased self-confidence, greater conversational prowess and intensified consciousness… “It offers the most wonderful state of consciousness, and the most intense sense of being alive [that] the user will ever enjoy.”****

I wonder if we replace the words "smoking crack cocaine" with the words "falling in love," does the sentence still make sense? Falling in love leads to ‘enhanced mood, heightened sexual interest, a feeling of increased self-confidence, greater conversational prowess and intensified consciousness…It offers the most wonderful state of consciousness, and the most intense sense of being alive that the user will ever enjoy.’ Yes, I'd say that fits, wouldn't you?

A further common marker of both falling in love and smoking cocaine is a clear stimulatory effect. Users of cocaine feel that the drug sharpens their focus and allows them to achieve an almost superhuman state of electrifying purpose. Making this connection between the two states of being may provide insight into some of the commonly reported experiences associated with falling in love. For example, the similarity between the two states may explain why new love prompts us to float and flit between our daily activities with a certain glow, bursting with vitality and charged with energy, all while whistling a cheerful tune.

Unlike crack cocaine, the effects of this “falling in love” high persist for weeks, months, even two years in some cases. The stimulatory effect of “love crack” may also help explain how we are able to stay up night after night for weeks or months on end, staring into each other’s eyes and whispering words of adoration to each other despite having full days of work or school.

Later in a relationship, romance continues to be possible and even deepens in many ways in healthy relationships; however, our behavior in later stages tends to be governed more by the laws of normal reality. When the initial stimulatory effect of new love wears off, we are much more likely to tell our partners that we love them and that we wish them a good night's rest lest we invite massive headaches and foggy thinking at work the next day.

Ultimately, the explosion of pleasurable chemicals released during the cocaine-rush phase of new love relationships leads to some monstrously short-sighted decision making in the cocaine- rush stage of relationships. To illustrate, let’s shift gears away from love relationships for a minute. Imagine that you are moving from the East Coast to the West Coast and your realtor tells you that your dream house has just come on the market. She informs you that the house has all the features you've been seeking—enough bedrooms and bathrooms and the type of particular architectural style you favor.

Naturally, you might begin to ask about the history and condition of the house. Imagine that your realtor said, "Well, I don't know, there might be some problems, but there's no time to do a home inspection. Someone else expressed interest in this house earlier today, so we'd better submit the highest binding offer you can afford and do it today."

What would you do? If the contract were completely binding with no built-in escape clause (which, thankfully, isn't generally true when you buy a home), would you commit all of your savings to this deal? Would you take this particular leap, sight unseen, without any knowledge of serious potential problems in the foundation of the house, legal complications you might get saddled with, extensive infestation of termites, or expensive structural issues that may need to be addressed?

To shift back to love relationships, these stakes are puny in comparison to the acceptance of a legal bond with another person in which you bind your finances, your hopes, and dreams to theirs while exclusively committing your emotional and sexual fidelity to them for the rest of your life!

Would it be intelligent to smoke some crack cocaine and then make a binding decision about buying a house that sounds perfect on paper in this state of mind? Would it be intelligent to take a leap into marriage in this frame of mind?

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Channeling tens of millions of refugees to Europe can kill feminism and Europe. It can do so reliably in the span of two decades. And to aide it is low risk political activism for people with a lot of money. Suited for Qatari and Russian billionaires. Just finance humanitarian efforts, such as rescue vessels on the Mediterranean, or life vests for those who board in Libya.

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Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia

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How to make your penis bigger: All the options

According to plastic surgeons, cosmetic procedures for men in the UK have risen 200 per cent in the last decade and demand for intimate procedures is unprecedented. Thanks to advances in cosmetic surgery, a range of cutting-edge injectables and implants mean that you can now be picture perfect for your next "belfie".

Scrotox

The latest plastic surgery takes vanity to a new, ballsy level. The nonsurgical plastic procedure is "scrotox", which is Botox shot into the scrotum. The procedure, which costs £400 to £650, takes a man's prunes and turns them into plums. So why do men get their "balls done"? Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr Randal Haworth believes there are three reasons.

First: "It keeps the balls from sweating," which is a big issues if you're an athlete.

Second: "It makes the balls look bigger."

And finally: "It gives the scrotum a more youthful look."

The Botox "relaxes" the wrinkles. They also "tighten up and move closer" to the body, giving the old boys a lift. With scrotox, you'll end up with the testes of a 12-year-old boy. The UK tends to be about three years behind the US in plastic surgery and scrotox is a relatively new procedure. Since it only lasts around four months, it's not yet as popular as other procedures. That said, the procedure is coming to the UK soon and is predicted to be big.

The Brazilian butt lift

The second most popular procedure for men - after pectoral implants - is the Brazilian Butt Lift (BBL). Who gets this procedure? We asked Dr Matthew Schulman, a surgeon in New York City, who performs many of them. "About 75 per cent of men requesting BBLs are gay and looking to increase the size and roundness of their buttocks," he says. "The other 25 per cent are straight men who complain that they have always had a flat butt." The results are permanent. "The advantage of this procedure is that it also includes liposuction as a way of harvesting donor fat. This allows for simultaneous contouring of the hip flanks and abdomen." Finally, a fat stomach that's good for something.

Dr Schulman also notes that it's a millennial phenomenon, with men aged between 20-35 requesting it the most. "The Kardashians have fuelled the increase in the procedure. Plus, Instagram has made us very conscious of how our body looks and there are plenty of photos of ideal butts." A reality show changed the beauty aesthetic of the United States and started a body modification trend that has trickled down to men. At a recent Hollywood party, the prevailing look for women was thin with a big derriere, stuffed into a tight dress.

For thin men with no body fat to harvest, Dr Schulman also provides silicone butt implants, but says they are riskier and can cause infection and shifting. And you can't sit down for three months until "the seeds are grown", as Dr Schulman explains. But at nearly £7,000 for each procedure, at least you'll have an ass like a Kardashian.

The P-shot

The P-shot or the Priapus shot was named after the Greek god of fertility. The shot was pioneered by Dr Charles Runels, an American MD who specialises in sexuality issues. The patient's blood is withdrawn, processed through a centrifuge to create platelet-rich plasma which contains growth factors. The process is used in sport medicine to rejuvenate torn ligaments. Dr Runels uses it to increase penis size by ten to 20 per cent and improve blood flow for a stronger, harder erection. Runels, the inventor of the Vampire Facelift says, "When I first started doing cosmetic procedures to sculpt the face, it occurred to me that it would be wonderful to do the same thing to the penis."

A study in the Journal Of Urology researching new therapies for erectile dysfunction found that "neovascularisation using vascular growth factors have been demonstrated to be feasible in animal models". So if you inject growth factors into a human penis, it'll grow new tissue and blood vessels and you will end up with a cock the size of a horse (probably).

In 2016, a gift certificate worth £1,375 was placed in the Oscar swag bags of nominees up for Best Actor In A Leading Role and Supporting Role, which included Michael Fassbender and Leonardo DiCaprio. "The 'penis rejuvenation' shot promises a bigger and firmer trouser trophy. It lasts 18 months, which gives time to be up for Best Erection In A Leading Role.

The penis implant

The equivalent of breast implants, the penis implant has finally popped up as a surgical option. Unlike the penile implant used for erectile dysfunction, this invention is for looks only. A silicone sheath wraps around the shaft to make it 2.5-4cm wider and longer. To be a candidate for the new penis implant, you can't have diabetes and can't be taking a blood thinner. And you have to be circumcised first, which is a great deal if you're Jewish.

The implant was invented in 2003, and since then only one doctor, Dr James Elist, a urologist and plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, does the surgery. He has performed over 1,300 experimental operations, with what he says is a 95 per cent satisfaction rate. He is waiting for final FDA approval so he can license his product globally, so men around the world will go from having a small one to having a suitable-for-a-dick-pic one. If and when that happens, the penis implant will be the next big thing.

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The world is full of multimillionaires who can't handle money. Because, if you have money, you want to go somewhere where it counts. Not stay in North America or Western Europe.

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Family Claims Wide-Awake Surgery Led to Minister's Suicide

Foxnews Published April 10, 2007 Associated Press

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – In the last two weeks of his life, Sherman Sizemore felt like people were trying to bury him alive.

Now, more than a year later, members of his family say the horrifying experience of being conscious during surgery but unable to move or speak led directly to the Beckley minister's suicide — perhaps the first such case in the country.

Advocates say Sizemore's death should draw attention to a little-discussed phenomenon called anesthesia awareness that could happen to between 20,000 and 40,000 people a year in America.

In some instances, patients might be conscious for only a few seconds, but cases like Sizemore's, where people remain conscious for most of their surgery, can lead to post-traumatic stress, experts say.

"It's the first time I know of anyone succeeding in taking their own lives because of this, but suicidal thoughts are not all that uncommon," said Carol Weihrer, president of the Virginia-based Anesthesia Awareness Campaign, which she founded after her own experience with anesthesia awareness.

Sizemore, a former coal miner and Baptist minister, was admitted to Raleigh General Hospital on Jan. 19, 2006, for surgery aimed at diagnosing the cause of abdominal pain, according to a lawsuit filed March 13 in Raleigh County Circuit Court.

An anesthesiologist and nurse anesthetist who worked for Raleigh Anesthesia Associates gave Sizemore paralyzing drugs to prevent his muscles from jerking and twitching during the surgery, the complaint alleges. But it says they failed to give him general anesthesia to render him unconscious until 29 minutes into the procedure — 16 minutes after the first cut into his abdomen.

Sizemore was awake for the procedure, but couldn't speak or move. Worse, the complaint charges, Sizemore was never told that he hadn't been properly anesthetized, and was tormented by doubts about whether his memories were real.

The lawsuit, filed against Raleigh Anesthesia Associates by two of his daughters, goes on to say that in the two weeks after his surgery, Sizemore became a different person. He couldn't sleep, refused to be left alone, suffered nightmares and complained people were trying to bury him alive.

On Feb. 2, 2006, Sizemore killed himself. His family says he had no history of psychological distress before his surgery.

"Being helpless and being in that situation can obviously be tough on people's psychological well-being," said Tony O'Dell, a Charleston lawyer who filed the complaint, which seeks unspecified damages.

Calls to Raleigh Anesthesia Associates were referred to Charleston lawyer Bill Foster, who said he wouldn't comment until he had more time to study the complaint.

Anesthesia awareness — also called unintended intraoperative awareness — happens when a patient who should be under general anesthesia is aware of some or all of a surgical procedure. Causes can include doctor errors, faulty equipment or patients who can't take a deep level of anesthesia, as with some trauma cases or emergency heart surgeries.

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations cites studies that show anesthesia awareness could happen in 0.1 to 0.2 percent of surgeries involving general anesthesia in this country — or between 20,000 and 40,000 a year. Patients who have experienced it often report sensations of not being able to breathe and feeling pain. Half of all patients also report mental distress after the surgery, including post-traumatic stress disorder.

In 2005, the American Society of Anesthesiologists adopted guidelines calling for doctors to follow a checklist protocol for anesthesia equipment to make sure proper doses are being delivered. However, the ASA stopped short of endorsing brain-monitoring equipment as a standard of care, saying doctors should decide on a case-by-case basis whether such machines are necessary.

"It could be that some day everybody who gets anesthesia will have a brain-wave monitor," said Dr. Robert Johnstone, a professor of anesthesiology at the West Virginia University School of Medicine.

Johnstone says such monitors are used at WVU, but in conjunction with a range of other equipment anesthesiologists use to measure everything from blood pressure to body temperature. When such monitors and tests are used properly, he said, the chance of someone being awake for a lengthy surgery is slim.

It was not clear whether Raleigh General uses such monitors. Calls to the hospital were not immediately returned Monday.

"The incidence of unintended awareness is rare," said Lisa Thiemann, director of practice for the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. But she said the organization is concerned enough about it to adopt its own guidelines, including calls for hospitals to conduct post-surgery interviews with patients to learn whether they were awake during surgery.

Weihrer said that recognition of the experience and proper psychological counseling is often the only thing patients want.

"The reason people sue is because they want to be acknowledged," said Weihrer, who won an out-of-court settlement after her anesthesia failed during a five-hour eye surgery in 1998. "They don't want to be told 'you weren't awake, it was a dream.' I hate the word 'dream."'

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Europe is doomed. Once terrorists have understood that arson everywhere is a cost that even Europe cannot shoulder, the European era will end. Time to dispose of Euro bonds.

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Man beaten, penis tied to pole after child rape claims surface

Cape Town - A man who was recorded being assaulted in an alleged mob violence incident in Valhalla Park, in a video which is being shared in social media, has refused to open a case against his attackers.

The assault comes after he was accused of raping a child.

In the video circulating on social media, people are seen beating the man with wooden planks as he sits on the ground. He appears to be dressed in only a t-shirt, and his penis is tied with string to a pole next to him.

A woman at one point says she had beaten him "enough" with a hammer on his genitals.

People kick the man, who has numerous facial wounds, while the crowd also threatens to set him alight.

A child can also be seen on a woman's hip, witnessing the attack.

Provincial police spokesperson Lieutenant-Colonel Andre Traut confirmed the incident.

"It is alleged by the community that he sexually assaulted a child, but police have no record of any sexual cases in Valhalla Park or any rape suspect who is sought," he said.

Family transported the man to hospital and police, but he refused to open a case.

"We are looking into the circumstances surrounding the matter," Traut said.

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Contribute to the neomasculine cause by helping to finance its propaganda. Make an anonymous donation to Serge Kreutz to keep up our websites, and ultimately change the world.

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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I had vagina therapy with a vagina physiotherapist

I thought the recovery from my child’s birth would be easier than the birth itself. I was wrong.

My baby was born by scalpel – an episiotomy. Episiotomy, also known as perineotomy, is described as a surgical incision of the perineum and the posterior vaginal wall generally done by a midwife or obstetrician during second stage of labor to quickly enlarge the opening for the baby to pass through.

I cannot put into words what it was actually like.

She was perfect, although a little bloody. I expected to be back on my feet quickly. But I was wrong, so very wrong.

Life with a newborn is not easy, even less so when you have another child or two that also needs your attention. It is even harder when you are in excruciating pain.

The constant pain was debilitating. I was unable to walk some days and was often forced to look after my two children from the floor where I crawled everywhere. When my husband came home I was an emotional and physical wreck. I was often in so much pain I had to dose myself up on medication and lay face down on the carpet next to the blanket on the floor that contained a days worth of spit up.

Even thinking about sex was hard, it was eight weeks before we gave it a go for the first time. My husband was understanding, sympathetic about the lack of sex during the first few months, and lets be honest – also very tired from helping me with the night shift. But I’m sure it was also frustrating for him.

After eight weeks I was physically healed, but mentally… not so much. It was not really painful during sex, but it sure was afterwards.

I began to become convinced that there was something seriously wrong with my vagina.

I went to the doctor and pleaded with her to try and fix me. She gave my vagina the once over and said that everything looked fine, but said that there may be some nerve damage and she would send me off to get X-rays just in case it was a broken pubic bone.

Well hell, this must be it! I thought.

My vagina is broken! Six bloody months of walking around with a broken bloody vagina. It made sense!

Then the X-ray came back all clear. Although I was convinced that they must have done it wrong, I had to accept I didn’t have a broken vagina.

There was only one more step to take and the doctor suggested a physiotherapist…. for my vagina.

So off I went to a vagina physiotherapist. To have vagina therapy.

Did you even know this was an actual job? I sure didn’t. And as I sat in the hospital waiting room looking at all of the other patients quietly waiting in wheelchairs, sitting with helpers – post car crashes and work injuries – I worried about what they might be thinking of me. Where was her injury? Why wasn’t she limping enough to notice?

I walked into the little room accompanied by the physiotherapist, an attractive smart blonde woman with shiny black flats. I really wanted to ask her right off the bat what her deal was, why vaginas? Why not feet? But I saved that for the second visit two months later when she told me that she just wanted to help women and their sexual health. She sounded legit.

The exam was similar to a doctors exam but without as many contraptions, she asked me to do a kegel (where you tighten your vagina). I did, and she looked at me quite surprised, “Hmmmmmm” she said, with her finger still wriggling around inside me.

“That’s about as strong as I have felt…” she kept wiggling. “… And the left side is VERY tight!”

Post-exam she sat me down and told me what the problem was. I had a tight vagina. Actually she used the words “I think you have a condition known as vaginismus which is a genito-pelvic pain disorder. A condition that affects a woman’s ability to engage in vaginal penetration, where your pelvic floor is tight and can spasm.”

But all I heard was “TIGHT VAGINA”.

And you know what? I smiled, looked up to the ceiling nodded my head and laughed.

This whole time I’m walking around in constant pain thinking I had broken myself when in reality it was my muscles tightening up so much on the left side that the pain radiated down my legs.

She gave me a print out with information about vaginismus. On the flip side of the page was some yoga, breathing and visualisation exercises.

I’m not really the most serious person. The printout had a diagram of a stick figure lady, legs up in the air, visualising her vagina relaxing. To this day, it’s quite possibly the most hilarious thing I have ever seen.

But I did all of the exercises. I breathed calmly like you wouldn’t believe. I visualised the hell out of my vagina getting all loose.

And it worked!

The pain subsided and I could walk around like a normal person without feeling like someone had shoved a porcupine up there.

The problem with any disorder that is caused in part by anxiety is that you are sometimes the only one that is in charge of your own recovery.

When I was diagnosed my physiotherapist had said exactly that to me:

“I have good news and bad news. The good news is that you are in charge of your own recovery. The bad news is that you are in charge of your own recovery.” Those words have stuck with me.

You can be helped along by medication and pain relief – both of which I have definitely taken. But ultimately it’s up to you. And it’s daunting to be the only one that can really fix you, but it is also empowering.

You don’t have to have a traumatic birth for you to be traumatised in some way, you don’t have to have a difficult birth in order to feel it was difficult for you. Birth is such a different experience for us all and our own experience of it and how we deal with it afterwards is unique.

Vaginismus is often triggered by childbirth but it can also be something that was always there, something that can develop in your teenage years. It can stop women from ever having sex or it can mean having painful sex frequently.

If you think you might have something similar please see your doctor as it could be a symptom of anxiety or something else.

Your sexual health is just as important as anything else in your life. I never thought I’d have vagina therapy but I’m very glad I did.

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Kreutz Ideology analyses destruction differently. Social violence inherently benefits economic elites. The less peaceful a society, the less does social control restrict the liberties of the wealthy.

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Angela Nagle: Roosh V falls foul of the online outrage cycle

Last week we were warned that a “pro-rape group” would be organising a pro-rape rally in Naas, Co Kildare, and several online petitions called on the Taoiseach to ban the meeting. But there is more to the story than reports suggested.

The controversial meetings were to take place in towns and cities around the world as part of the Return of Kings website’s call for an international meet-up day.

In other words, it was a small internet meet-up in Naas of an obscure forum to meet like-minded men and discuss anti-feminist politics and pick-up artistry, or as they like to call it “game”.

Or it would have been had it gone ahead. Soon after the meetings were announced the website’s creator cancelled them because of fear for the “safety” of his followers, presumably against female protesters and potential attackers.

The website’s creator, known as Roosh V, is an anti-feminist polemicist who has been the subject of petitions around the world seeking to ban him from entry to Canada, the UK and the US, each gathering tens of thousands of signatures.

He sees himself as part of a broader “neomasculinist” movement, which gained prominence within the men’s rights movement of the 1990s, reasserting a strong masculinity perceived to be under attack.

The Return of Kings website is part of a wider online constellation of anti-feminist “manosphere” subcultures and forums from pick-up artists to MGTOW (Men Going Their Own Way), which is made up of heterosexual men who rather unconvincingly claim to be voluntarily abstaining from relations with women.

Roosh wrote a book series called Bang, advising men on tactics to get women in different countries to sleep with them.

Political dimension

Roosh’s adventures had a political and economic dimension too, as he had a harder time impressing women in social-democratic feminist Denmark, for example, but claims to have had more luck in eastern Europe where women are, he creepily reports, more “traditional”, a virtue one might have expected to create a hurdle to the central project of Bang.

However, the “pro-rape rally” claim, repeated uncritically in headlines all over the world, deserves some analysis. It comes from a blog post written by Roosh called How to Stop Rape, in which he makes an absurd claim that making rape legal on private property will stop rape.

The pick-up artist has since repeatedly claimed that the piece was satire. What exactly it might be satirising is hard to deduce, but it is highly plausible that the failed satire wasn’t intended to be taken literally and Roosh V has repeated multiple times on Twitter and elsewhere that he does not advocate rape.

Disgusting views

One can easily argue against the sincerity of his claim, but why was this reported as a pro-rape rally, a claim now reported around the world as an objective fact, when it is an internet forum meet-up organised on the website of a man who, despite having disgusting views on women, is on record many times saying he does not actually advocate rape?

The increasingly predictable cycle of social media outrage, followed by mainstream media outrage, followed by petitioning of the State to enforce bans on speech and assembly also comes in the context of several years of ongoing online culture wars in which we have even seen feminists like Germaine Greer “no-platformed” on campuses by the new crop of younger feminists for offensive speech.

We’ve seen the language and politics of the new feminism used against left-wing pro-feminist candidates Bernie Sanders in the US and Jeremy Corbyn in the UK. The “Berniebro” myth, that smears Sanders fans as overwhelmingly male, sexist and macho internet trolls, became a source of further online flame wars, opinion and think pieces, despite the notable absence of evidence. The best way to have dealt with Return of Kings’ squalid little internet meet-ups would have been to mock, ignore or challenge them instead of calling on the State to intervene.

Incitement laws

In the context of the current immigration and refugee crisis, are progressives really going to legitimise the banning of foreign men on the basis of their opinions? And if so, who do we think will get to decide what constitutes a harmful opinion?

Given how widespread incitement to violence laws are, the way in which the press uncritically took its cue from social media outrage on the Roosh V issue should be worrying to us all, especially in the new online media economy, where outrage generates clicks. Today it may be a sexist fool with retrograde opinions but eventually the fact-immune outrage cycle may come for you too.

Angela Nagle is a writer and academic researcher

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There is no such thing as fake news. Some news are just borrowed from different strings of the multiverse.

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